Why Twitter is Good for your Business

Twitter is good for business

What will Twitter do for my business?

I get asked this several times a week. It seems that the concept of Twitter is still a little unclear to many business owners, which is a real shame because on the business side Twitter is a great tool that can give a small start up or sole trader the same sized voice and ears as a large organisation.

Twitter is a micro blogging and social networking application that asks: What’s happening? In 140 characters or less you are able to follow the thoughts and actions of people and organisations of interest through their posts, and likewise collect your own followers who have an interest in your posts.

It is a real time feed of your network and of the global network which can be informative, entertaining and often very useful.

Today we will look at 3 benefits of Twitter; subscribers, aggregation and traffic.

It is much easier to get a Twitter follower than it is to get a subscriber to your database

With twitter you can get 500+ followers in a few weeks using manual methods and you can send communications several times a day! I can’t imagine many apps that give you this much exposure so quickly, my clients who have really jumped in have been pleasantly surprised with some very quick results.

Twitter lets you aggregate bite sized, real time information

With the Twitter search option you can see what people all over the world are saying on a particular topic. You don’t even need to be a member of twitter to use this feature. Here are two examples of how useful the aggregation of real time posts can be…

Example 1. Say you want to drive up north for the New Year, being holiday season you are worried about the traffic. Search for: Sydney Traffic

Results:

sydtraffic_sw Sydney Metropolitan: Various Streets; Heavy traffic; Lanes: All dirs; Traffic: Heavy; Expect delays; expect heavy delays

norwestbusiness Sydney NW Traffic: sydtraffic_nw: Sydney Metropolitan: Various Streets; Heavy traffic; Lanes: All dirs; Traffic: Heavy;.. http://is.gd/5CJzx

chefben Traffic north of Sydney on the F3 sucks big time. If you thinking of heading North wait till tonight

sydtraffic_city Sydney CBD: Macq St at Martin Place; Changed traffic conds: Protest; Lanes: Sthbnd; Expect delays; Attending: Emerg Svcs

Example 2. You are running out of time to get a product to market and you need a graphic designer to design a logo for you at short notice, you need to find someone who is ready to work now and some tips on how to hire a graphic designer. Search for: Hire a graphic designer

Results:

OpticSugarMedia How To Hire A Great Graphic Designer: http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-hirea-great-graphicdesigner-2009-12

jdougdesign Anyone out there want to hire a kilted, ruggedly good looking graphic designer/photographer? Anyone?

patricia_coelho “Sam Gilbey is a freelance illustrator, graphic designer and art director, and is available for hire” = http://tinyurl.com/2pzzvl

In both of these examples the searches returned to the minute information and contacts that would have saved me time in looking in multiple sites and even posting ads for the graphic designer.

In addition try searches that would be posted by potential customers in your industry, you may find some instant business.

Twitter will direct warm traffic to your website, blog or articles

Twitter is about information and interaction. You interact on a personal level with those who interest you, and provide information to your followers; everything from inane musings to links, tips and calls to action. Post news and links to your articles, blogs, pictures, social media profiles and event pages. If it is interesting people will click on your links and check out your work.

If people like what you have to say they will also check out your profile which displays your web address. If you are interesting and you interact with people you will start to see Twitter become a strong source of referrals to your website and work.

Happy Hunting!

Serena “Social Star”

*twitter birds designed by Luc Latulippe